Bees Teaching Each Other

Bees Teaching Each Other

When the light is low and just right, it’s possible to follow a bee’s flight path. On occasion, I’ve observed pairs of bees leave a hive and fly in close formation. It was obvious one bee was following the other. Was it being taught? Small cell colonies initially detect and remove mite infected pupa. Although the effects were dramatic, many colonies still perished. But after the […]

Beebread and Core Gut Bacteria

Beebread and Core Gut Bacteria

Randy Oliver has published part 3 in his Re-evaluating Beebread series. This series and his other articles are well worth a read. It’s been awhile since I’ve written anything about honeybee symbiotic micro organisms. Since then, some additional pertinent  research has been released. For me, that’s good news, as it should lead beekeeping from the nuke em disease/pest treatment model, to a more probiotic/symbiotic approach. […]

Superinfection Exclusion

Superinfection Exclusion

There are many factors that make natural beekeeping successful. Could this be one factor that explains why natural beekeeping principles work so well against mite and mite vectored disease? Need more information? Here’s the research article. -dM

Historical Comb Cell Size

Historical Comb Cell Size

New research indicates that the basic premises for small cell beekeeping are in error. Brood foundation hasn’t been enlarged. And historical cell size measurements methods haven’t confused this issue. This confirms what I’ve written about  A.I. Roots observations. -dM

Bees and Hexagons

Bees and Hexagons

Radiolab does it again.   Solved! A bee-buzzing, honey-licking 2,000-year-old mystery that begins here, with this beehive. Look at the honeycomb in the photo and ask yourself: (I know you’ve been wondering this all your life, but have been too shy to ask out loud … ) Why is every cell in this honeycomb a hexagon? My kind of bee math. Check it out.

Co-evolution of Bees and Mites

Co-evolution of Bees and Mites

At Beesource, Mike Bispham shared a paper describing the co-evolution of two bee populations in Europe. Host Adaptations Reduce the Reproductive Success of Varroa Destructor in Two Distinct European Honey Bee Populations Dr. Tom Seeley has  suggested a similar process is at work in the Arnot Forest near Cornell University. Check it out. Years ago, I setup a small cell test yard optimized for the […]

Intro to Native Bees

Intro to Native Bees

June Apiculture Newsletter has a link to a neat, free pdf resource on native pollinators. It’s put out by the United States Forest Service and the USDA Pollinator Partnership. I like the photos and the illustrations. A great book byBeatriz Mosset and Stephen Buchmann. Bee Basics – An Introduction to Our Native Bees Thanks Guys. It’s a great resource! And don’t forget Eric’s May/June newletter. […]

High Speed Summary of Life Inside the Beehive

High Speed Summary of Life Inside the Beehive

Another great YouTube video. Thanks AndersHQ. -dM

SAD and BAD Bees

SAD and BAD Bees

While doing a little clean up work on this site, I went back to BeeSource’s POV page to get a link. And while there, was drawn to re-read some of Andy Nachbaur’s Bee-L posts. Andy was one of the first commercial beekeepers who spent any time writing on the net. I never met him. But always found him well worth reading. And who can forget […]

Bee Genetics

Bee Genetics

Natural beekeeping tends to produce superior honeybee colonies. Ever wonder why? Randy Oliver, in a talk with North American Beekeeping Federation(ABF) bee breeders describes why. The ABF recorded his presentation and kindly provides access to it. Scientific Beekeeping: Thoughts About Queen Breeding Randy discusses: epigenetics natural selection processes the effects of treating and genetic selection why natural triumphs over hybridization and how to win in […]

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